Sunshine, Turtle, Lindsay, Fern Gully and I at the top of Mt Katahdin on September 27th, 2014

Our Last Day on the Appalachian Trail

“Guys, I can see the road!”

We spent 5 long, hard days to see this road. The story of us summiting Mount Katahdin and finishing our 2014 Appalachian Trail Thru-Hike starts 15 trail miles south of the infamous wooden sign on the top of Katahdin. This is the point where the trail crosses the Golden Road and the Penobscot River and where we left the 100 Mile Wilderness and re-entered “civilization”. Leaving the 100 Mile Wilderness and sitting down on a picnic bench at the Abol Bridge Campground, overlooking the fast flowing Penobscot, is when the realization hit us that our journey was all but over. We could see Katahdin, likely only 5 miles as the crow flies to the summit from where we sat drinking a well deserved beer and eating an overpriced cheeseburger. The next day we would climb the big guy and end our journey, which at this point seemed a formality and more symbolic than necessary. We had made it. We had hiked from Springer Mountain, Georgia to Mt Katahdin, Maine and we were a day away from climbing to the summit and ending our journey.

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Mt Katahdin, two days of hiking from the peak.

The 100 Mile Wilderness of Maine

The infamous 100 Mile Wilderness of northern Maine, the only thing standing between us and the base of Mt Katahdin. What is the 100 Mile? It is advertised as an isolated and remote stretch of virgin wilderness through marshy moose bog habitat with easy rolling terrain connecting pristine lakes. The idea of hiking completely through this section originated almost a century ago in connecting several hunting camps situated only a day apart. As time passed the hunting camps slowly disappeared and the 100 mile experience changed from something geared toward the upscale outdoorsman to a rugged, self reliant wilderness trek. The foreboding reputation of this section of the Appalachian Trail has created a sense of fear and anxiety amongst the pool of modern AT Thru Hikers and it has now become an almost impassable barrier. Mentally at least. With communication technology developing and an influx of thru-hikers with greater disposable cash, the 100 mile has morphed once again to something different. The distance between Monson, Maine and the Golden Road on the boundary of Baxter State Park is still 100 miles but the mystique of a true wilderness experience has become a thing of the past.

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Clay looking very scary at the Maine state line.

The Maine Appalachian Trail; Sep 9th (1887mi) to Sep 21st (2070mi)

Maine. My home state, the final state on the northbound Appalachian Trail, the second longest state on the AT and arguably the most primitive and natural section of trail on the entire 2200 mile journey. Within miles of crossing the New Hampshire border we came face to face with what we call the most difficult range of the AT, the Mahoosuc Mountains. As we hiked the northern New England section of the AT our fellow hikers talked about two sections of the upcoming trail more than anything else: The White Mountains and the Mahoosuc Notch. The Mahoosuc Notch, or Mahoosuc Mile, is considered to be the hardest mile of the entire AT.  With the Notch buried deep in the middle of the Mahoosuc Mountain range, the range itself gets very little attention and is consequently a very underestimated section of the trail. The Mahoosuc’s only take up about 75 miles of trail but it made us earn every one of those miles the hard way. As opposed to many of the other mountainous sections where we would make a big climb and then attempt to follow a ridge line, the Mahoosuc’s did not have a ridge line to follow. Making it through them and getting to Andover took five days of long and difficult hiking, with never-ending steep ascents and descents on rock ledges, boulder fields and a few stone steps if we were lucky!

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Lindsay, Spiff and Axeman make the descent off of Baldpate Mountain

Why you don’t listen to the weatherman

On the morning we left Andover for our final two week push to Katahdin we did what any responsible hiker would do: check the weather report. We made sure we had the proper gear for the forecasted temperatures, which were daytime highs in the 60s and lows in the mid 40s. Since we knew we would be sleeping in the mountains we figured on nighttime temperatures to be more realistically at about 40. Perfect! Low chance of rain, and decent temps allowed us to trim our clothing weight by a few pounds and travel a little lighter for the first week of our final two. We have good gear and generally err on the side of caution so we took off figuring we would be a-okay. I don’t know why I actually trusted the weather man.
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The Journey is Complete

I know we haven’t fully recapped our 2,185.3 mile hiking adventure but we couldn’t delay putting this up any longer. On September, 27th Lindsay and I summited Mt Kathadin in northern Maine, finishing our 2014 Appalachian Trail Thru-Hike. We took off our well worn boots and hung up our quite smelly backpacks after 5 months and 3 days of rain, sun, sweat, cold, tears, beers and most importantly stories and friendships that will last a lifetime.

Sunshine, Turtle, Lindsay, Fern Gully and I at the top of Mt Katahdin on September 27th, 2014
Sunshine, Turtle, Lindsay, Fern Gully and I at the top of Mt Katahdin on September 27th, 2014

Discussing and writing the blog became a regular part in our day to day life on the trail and if you’re reading this then you played a role in our success. Thank you for following along with our misguided adventures, pretending that our pictures aren’t terrible and not tearing up my writing… most of the time at least!

We’re going to keep writing about the journey for the next few weeks and plan on spending our winter updating the blog every week so keep checking back!

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